Six months: 1 in 4 Iowa workers file jobless claims

While the employment crisis persists, Congress is seemingly deadlocked over the question of extending enhanced unemployment benefits — which expire this week.

The week ending July 25th marked the 26th week of the COVID-19 Recession. In that half year, 420,702 working Iowans (including another 7,441 last week) have filed for unemployment insurance. This is a staggering number. It represents almost one-quarter of the February 2020 labor force. And it is nearly four times the number of claims (107,344) filed by Iowans over the first six months of the Great Recession.

The largest differences between the last recession and this one have come from the eighth week on. The last 19 weeks represent 403,697 of the total increase in this recession, all of those weeks substantially higher than the comparable period in the Great Recession.

While the employment crisis persists, Congress is seemingly deadlocked over the question of extending enhanced unemployment benefits — which expire this week. The HEROES Act, passed by the House in May, would extend the $600/week PUC program through January 31, 2021. The HEALS Act pushed by Senate Republicans would slash that benefit to $200 through the end of September, and then cap the total UI benefit at 70 percent of lost wages. If this passes, weekly benefits for Iowa’s unemployed would drop from an average of $927 per week to $527 per week — a cut of 43 percent. To add insult to injury, the Senate plan also neglects to extend the federal moratorium on evictions.

This is a perilous moment. With new unemployment claims holding steady at more than double the weekly claims of the Great Recession, and economic recovery faltering in the face of surging COVID cases, we need to protect Iowa’s working families from both income insecurity and housing insecurity.

Colin Gordon is senior research consultant for the nonpartisan Iowa Policy Project. He is a professor of history at the University of Iowa.

Another 25K Iowans file unemployment claims

At a moment when going back to work poses grave public health risks, it is in our best interests to be generous in determining eligibility for benefits.

In the week ending May 2, another 24,693 Iowans applied for unemployment insurance. That brings the total new claims for unemployment insurance, over the last seven weeks, to 285,741.

Iowa’s insured unemployment rate (the share of the labor force receiving unemployment benefits, which does not include this week’s new claims) is now 11 percent. Since mid-March almost 1 in 5 Iowa workers (more than 18 percent of the non-farm labor force) have filed an unemployment claim.

This total does not include those who have dropped out of the labor force. It does not include those unable to access our overwhelmed unemployment insurance application system.

And it does not include those discouraged from even applying by Iowa Workforce Development’s chilling “get back to work” directive. The outcry against that directive — so clearly at odds with both Iowa law and the unemployment crisis at hand — has forced IWD to soften its tone. The “FAQ” for workers on IWD’s website now acknowledges that unsafe working conditions, and the failure of employers to provide adequate protection, constitute valid reasons for leaving a job and claiming benefits.

As the jobs crisis deepens, we need to remember that unemployment insurance is intended as a safety net, as a means of sustaining incomes through periods of both personal misfortune and broader economic troubles.

We are at a moment when going back to work poses grave public health risks, and when the federal government has stepped up to cover most of the costs. Under these conditions, it is in our best interests to be generous in the determination of eligibility for benefits — and to let Iowa workers displaced by this crisis make the right decision for themselves, for their families, and for their communities.

Colin Gordon is senior reearch consultant for the Iowa Policy Project, and a professor of history at the University of Iowa.

Iowa unemployment claims keep rising

New unemployment claims continued to climb in the week ending April 11. Nationally, 5,245,000 workers filed new claims, bring the total to 22,634,000 new claims since March 21 (when the first COVID-19 layoffs starting hitting the books). As this week’s release concludes glumly: “This marks the highest level of seasonally adjusted insured unemployment in the history of the seasonally adjusted series.” In Iowa, we added 46,356 new claims, for a four-week total of 207,468.

We can now also begin to see the impact on national and state unemployment rates. The weekly claims data allows us to calculate the “insured unemployment rate” or the share of the labor force receiving unemployment benefits. In Iowa, the insured unemployment rate rose to 10.2 percent for the week ending April 4.

200416-IA_insured_unemployed

It is important to point out that this represents a fraction of the actual unemployment rate, which is the share of the labor force unemployed but looking for work (in Iowa, only about 40 percent of unemployed workers receive unemployment benefits).

The rates of insured unemployed in the states for the week ending April 4 range from 3.8 percent in South Dakota to 17.8 percent in Rhode Island. For a conservative estimate of the actual unemployment rates by state, double these numbers. Those estimates — putting most states in the range from 20 to 30 percent — are steeper than the unemployment rates of the Great Depression.

Colin Gordon is a professor of history at the University of Iowa and senior research consultant at the nonpartisan Iowa Policy Project.

 

Iowa’s employment apocalypse

As daunting as we may find the new unemployment claims numbers, they understate the true scale of the damage to the economy.

This morning, the Department of Labor released the count of new weekly claims for unemployment insurance, marking the second week of claims reflecting the employment impact of the COVID-19 crisis. The numbers are staggering, not just for their scope but for their suddenness. Most downturns in the business cycle occur gradually over a number of months; this spike has occurred in just a couple of weeks. These numbers are also the best metric we have in this unfolding crisis, providing us a near real-time measure that the April jobs report (with a March 12 reference point) will largely miss.

Nationally, new claims for the week ending March 21 were 3.28 million; last week we added another 6.65 million new claims — a total fully 10 times the previous weekly peak. In the week ending March 21, Iowa fielded 40,952 claims for unemployment insurance; in the week ending March 28, we added another 58,453. The total over the last two weeks — almost 100,000 new claims — is about the same number of new claims filed in the first four months of the Great Recession. The graph below plots weekly claims since 2007, the Great Recession indicated by the grey shading.

These numbers, of course, understate the true scale of the damage. Those ineligible for regular unemployment insurance — including the self-employed, gig workers, independent contractors, and new entrants to the labor market) do not show up in the claims data — although this will change once the federal Pandemic Unemployment Assistance Program kicks in. And the underemployed, those who are hanging on to whatever hours they can get, are also uncounted here.

And Iowa is not alone. In a longer post at Dissent, I plot all the state numbers: Off-the-charts rates of new claims over the past two weeks are evident in almost all states — but especially in those with a high share of leisure and hospitality workers, and those hard hit by the pandemic itself. California logged 186,000 new claims in the week ending March 21; and added almost five times as many (878,000) this week. New claims in Louisiana, as a telling measure of the mess many states are in, spiked on March 21 to the same level (over 70,000) as those made in the immediate wake of Hurricane Katrina — and this past week added another 97,000 claims.

The best numbers we have show that Iowa and the nation will see a lot of economic harm. It is essential to help all workers now.

Colin Gordon is a professor of history at the University of Iowa, and senior research consultant at the Iowa Policy Project. He has authored or co-authored IPP’s State of Working Iowa series and several other IPP reports on issues affecting working families, jobs, pay and benefits.