Don’t take talkers’ comments at face value

What actually occurred is that restaurant and bar jobs grew in the Seattle metro area after the wage was raised.

The shameless way the public debate can be distorted never ends. Case in point: discussion about the minimum wage.

If you were in Eastern Iowa this morning listening to Simon Conway’s program on WMT-AM radio, you would not have an accurate idea of what happened in Seattle, Washington, following that city’s first step — to $11 — toward an eventual minimum wage of $15. Confusion on this issue has occurred in Johnson County, where supervisors have approved a $10.10 minimum wage by 2017.

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Peter Fisher
IPP Research Director

What actually occurred, as Peter Fisher of the Iowa Policy Project has pointed out, is that job numbers rose in Seattle after the wage was raised. See his Aug. 25 guest opinion in the Iowa City Press-Citizen. Excerpt:

There is also misinformation flying around about Seattle, which took the first step toward raising the minimum wage to $15 in April of this year. What actually occurred is that overall employment in Seattle grew after the wage was raised. … The idea that restaurants closed because of the wage hike turned out to be a myth — the owners of the four restaurants in question reported that wages had nothing to do with their decisions.

New job numbers since then show jobs to be up in Seattle — both overall and in the restaurant and drinking places category — and both over the year and since the first step of the minimum wage increase. While it would be a mistake to suggest the minimum wage is responsible, the leisure and hospitality category alone shows a net gain of 1,100 jobs since the higher minimum went into effect.*

Much number-crunching is yet to be done to enhance understanding about how the Seattle increase is now affecting and ultimately will affect the labor market in that area. But the fact that the scare tactics have had little substance behind them has been pretty clear from early on. See this Seattle Times story. Or this Forbes.com story.

The lesson here is not that the minimum wage increase caused an increase in jobs in Seattle — but that it’s ridiculous to say it hindered jobs.

That is, of course, if you are at all interested in the facts.

Owen-2013-57Posted by Mike Owen, Executive Director, Iowa Policy Project
Learn more about Iowa issues with the minimum wage on our website, www.iowapolicyproject.org
* seasonally adjusted jobs, Washington State Employment Security Department.