The need for TIF reform

Economic development types have become addicted to the idea that they can use TIF to do many things without regard to the impacts on neighbors or even the real purpose of TIF.

Peter Fisher speaks at TIF forum
IPP Research Director Peter Fisher speaks at a forum on tax-increment financing as Sen. Joe Bolkcom, D-Iowa City, and Rep. Tom Sands, R-Wapello, look on.

Peter Fisher’s report for the Iowa Fiscal Partnership about the use of tax-increment financing (TIF) painted a picture of a program that has become a monster. I encourage all to find the report on our website, or to view the forum in Coralville hosted by the bipartisan team of Sen. Joe Bolkcom, D-Iowa City, and Rep. Tom Sands, R-Wapello.

It takes some folks out of their comfort zone — apparently former Iowa City Council Member Bob Elliott among them in today’s Iowa City Press-Citizen — to see what an otherwise well-intentioned and potentially valuable tool has become due to lax state law. Cities across Iowa have shown an inability to handle the responsibility that goes with the permission to divert other jurisdictions’ tax revenues with TIF. Such projects that are supposed to benefit all whose revenues are being used. Unfortunately, it frequently does not work that way.

The report offers several ideas for reform to rein in abuses; it does not call for elimination of TIF, but for regulation. Perhaps Mr. Elliott missed that, as he states, “For me, an appropriate analogy to the TIF situation would be medical drugs, which can provide great benefit or be dangerously abused. In situations like that, you don’t eliminate it, you regulate against misuse and retain the capacity for beneficial use.” Agreed.

Indeed, the drug analogy is appropriate. Economic development types have become addicted to the idea that they can use TIF to do many things without regard to the impacts on neighbors or even the real purpose of TIF. Fisher’s report offers examples from Johnson County — notably Coralville’s use of property-tax dollars from one school district to create new property-tax base in another, in a project that effectively lured a major department store from Iowa City next door.

If state lawmakers ignore such examples, they will be repeated — in fact, it would give cities tacit approval to consider these practices appropriate. Take that, Clear Creek-Amana school district. Take that, Iowa City.

Fisher’s report is a wonderful example of how a nonpartisan organization that is focused wholly on issues, and not partisan politics, can help people of any political stripe to understand those issues. Iowans use our work and contribute to it because they know they can count on IPP to provide fact-based analysis and relevant research that holds the political spinners accountable. And yes, contributions to our work are welcome. Click here.

Posted by Mike Owen, Assistant Director

TIF public forum draws out facts, and people

Sen. Joe Bolkcom, D-Iowa City, and Rep. Tom Sands, R-Wapello, hosted the Coralville forum about an issue growing in attention following the release of Peter Fisher’s report for the Iowa Fiscal Partnership.


The room was packed, but now more people will be able to view the January 4 public forum in Coralville about tax-increment financing.

City Channel 4 — Iowa City Cable TV — will show the forum, which features a presentation by Iowa Policy Project Research Director Peter Fisher and comments by Iowa lawmakers and local officials. Fisher’s recent report, Tax-Increment Financing: A Case Study of Johnson County, was the focus of commentary throughout the hearing.

Hosted by State Sen. Joe Bolkcom, D-Iowa City, and State Rep. Tom Sands, R-Wapello, the forum has drawn much attention including media coverage by The Gazette in Cedar Rapids and The Press-Citizen in Iowa City.

The Iowa City cable presentation of the forum will be shown six times in the coming week, beginning at midnight today. The program runs 1 hour, 49 minutes. Here is the full schedule, also found on the Channel 4 website:

Saturday, January 07, at 12:00 a.m.
Saturday, January 07, at 9:30 p.m.
Monday, January 09, at 8:00 a.m.
Tuesday, January 10, at 5:30 a.m.
Wednesday, January 11, at 4:00 p.m.
Thursday, January 12, at 1:30 p.m.

To view slides that Fisher used in his presentation, click here.