Today’s virtual House graphic: Iowa impacts of ACA repeal

Repeal of the Affordable Care Act will leave fewer people in Iowa with insurance than before the law took effect.

Editor’s Note: The Iowa House of Representatives voted Monday to deny the ability of lawmakers to use visual aids in debate on the floor. To help Iowans visualize what kinds of graphics might be useful in these debates to illustrate facts, we will offer examples. Here is today’s graphic, to illustrate what could be expected to happen in Iowa if Congress repeals the Affordable Care Act.

170119-IFP-ACA-F2xxRepealing the Affordable Care Act (ACA) without an adequate replacement, as Congress and the incoming Trump administration appear poised to do, jeopardizes the health care coverage and economic well-being of the most vulnerable Iowans. About 230,000 fewer Iowans would have health coverage in 2019 if the law is repealed, including 25,000 children.

In fact, repeal of the ACA could leave tens of thousands of adults uninsured who actually had insurance prior to the ACA. Some 69,000 Iowans covered by an Iowa program, IowaCare, became part of the Iowa Health and Wellness Program with the advent of the ACA, while even more Iowans had insurance with the help of ACA subsidies.

Repeal leaves all three of those programs gone — IowaCare, Iowa Health and Wellness, and the ACA subsidies. Thus, fewer will have insurance than in 2013, prior to the ACA, and low-income Iowans will be worse off. This is an issue that state legislators may be left to address with no help from the U.S. Congress, but is not getting attention at the Iowa Statehouse.

For more information, see this Iowa Fiscal Partnership policy brief by Iowa Policy Project Research Director Peter Fisher.

Today’s virtual House graphic: Cutting wages in four counties

Local minimum wage ordinances cover one-third of the private-sector workers in the state of Iowa.

Editor’s Note: The Iowa House of Representatives voted Monday to deny the ability of lawmakers to use visual aids in debate on the floor. To help Iowans visualize what kinds of graphics might be useful in these debates to illustrate facts, we will offer examples. Here is today’s graphic, to illustrate where county-level minimum wages have passed and could be repealed.

Iowa 03-BLUE-countiesxljpIowa Policy Project reports have illustrated the impacts of increases in the minimum wage if enacted at the state level or, in some cases, at the local level. Four counties have enacted minimum wage increases in Iowa, with the Johnson County wage of $10.10 taking effect in three steps and fully implemented last month. Polk, Linn and Wapello counties also have passed county-level minimums.

If the state Legislature were to choose to repeal those local minimums, it would affect one-third of the private-sector workers in the state of Iowa. For more information about the minimum wage in Iowa, visit this page, and this blog post by IPP’s Peter Fisher.

Today’s virtual House graphic: Iowa’s growing spending on tax credits

Growth in tax-credit spending by the state of Iowa has erupted over the last decade.

Editor’s Note: The Iowa House of Representatives voted Monday to deny the ability of lawmakers to use visual aids in debate on the floor. To help Iowans visualize what kinds of graphics might be useful in these debates to illustrate facts, we will offer examples. Here is today’s graphic, to illustrate state trends in spending on business tax credits.

170207-taxcredits-2007-21As the Iowa Policy Project and Iowa Fiscal Partnership have pointed out before, Iowa’s perceived budget shortfalls are largely self-inflicted. Iowa Department of Revenue reports provide a lot of data about tax credits, particularly in reports that are prepared for use by the Revenue Estimating Conference, which determines what revenue lawmakers have available to spend. These reports show the cost of those credits, which are also known as “tax expenditures,” because they effectively spend money through the tax code — revenues that otherwise would be available for fund schools and other public services.

Growth in tax-credit spending has erupted in Iowa over the last decade, tripling from $75 million in FY2007 to $237 million last year. They are projected by the Department of Revenue to reach $279 million in the current fiscal year, and to nearly $300 million in just four years.

For more information about Iowa spending on tax credits, see this page on the Iowa Fiscal Partnership website.

County Minimum Wages Spread their Benefits Widely

Clearly, any action by the Iowa Legislature to roll back county minimum wages would harm workers and local economies in many of Iowa’s most populous counties.

It’s not just four counties that benefit from the higher local minimum wages that go into effect this year. Those four counties — Polk, Linn, Johnson and Wapello — account for a third of all private-sector jobs in the state. And a large number of people holding those jobs live in neighboring counties.

Polk, Linn and Johnson counties are the hubs of metropolitan areas, surrounded by counties where a sizeable share of the workforce commutes to the hub. Those commuters earn higher wages thanks to the county supervisors in the three counties. And they come home to spend those higher wages at local gas stations, restaurants, grocery stores and other retail shops. They hire local plumbers and builders and electricians. In all, at least 12 counties in addition to Polk, Linn and Johnson will see a substantial increase in resident incomes and local purchases as a result of those three county minimum wages.

The map below shows the percentage of lower wage workers in each suburban county who are employed in the hub county with the higher minimum wage.[1] Clearly, any action by the Iowa Legislature to roll back county minimum wages would harm the workers and the local economies in many of the state’s most populous counties.

Iowa 03-BLUE-counties

[1] Lower wage is defined as earnings of $3,333 per month or less. Restricting it to those earning $1,250 or less results in very similar percentages; the lower figure, however, would represent a wage of even less than the current minimum for someone working full time, whereas the county minimums when fully phased in will benefit all those earning under $10.10 (Johnson) to $10.75 (Polk), and some workers above those levels. These earnings cutoffs were the only ones provided in the Census data.

2010-PFw5464Posted by Peter Fisher, Research Director of the Iowa Policy Project

pfisher@iowapolicyproject.org

Mission accomplished — no cuts needed

What if Iowa promoted our low business taxes, rather than run us down?

Tax-cutters are in hog heaven in Iowa these days. They soon assume the levers of power at the State Capitol and they are planning to use them — no matter the consequences.

But if they truly believed their own mantra about the economic glories of low taxes, they would be shouting “Mission Accomplished” from the top of the Capitol dome. For all their talk of making Iowa “competitive,” they would realize we are already there, and have been for many, many years.

Once again, the national accounting firm Ernst & Young has examined the range of state and local taxes affecting businesses in every state plus Washington, D.C., and found Iowa is in the same place it always lands — the middle of the pack.

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Twenty-three states and D.C. tax business more heavily than Iowa, which is tied for 25th with six other states including neighboring Minnesota. Even South Dakota, despite a low-tax image trumpeted by western Iowa politicians, is slightly higher than Iowa.

That is because responsible tax policy demands a comprehensive look at the impact of all pieces of the tax structure, as Ernst & Young does. Cherry picking only one tax that appears high — appears being the key word because this can be complex — ignores other offsets in the tax code.

Yet, the post-election rhetoric has been a lot about tax cuts — tax cuts we cannot afford.

To the extent state and local taxes matter in business decisions — and there is considerable evidence that they do not, despite the political spin — Iowa already is well-situated. In other words, the concept of “competitiveness” can be overstated easily. A tax structure would have to be markedly different from others, producing high-tax results that we certainly don’t see in Iowa, to make a difference in business expansion and location decisions.

As we pointed out in 2014, Iowa is a low-tax state. This remains so. Why aren’t our elected officials promoting that if it is so important to them?

Having already implemented what the Governor promoted as the largest tax cut in Iowa history with massive property tax giveaways benefiting big-box retailers in 2013, and recognizing state revenues are coming in more slowly than expected, our leaders need to take a deep breath.

We cannot afford new tax cuts for business. For stronger economic growth, let’s turn the page and look at things that matter.

owen-2013-57Posted by Mike Owen, Executive Director of the Iowa Policy Project
mikeowen@iowapolicyproject.org

A squeaky wheel is heard — but not fixed​

The weak House attempt to satisfy Davenport on school funding inequities is a sign that a squeaky wheel is being heard. But the whole statewide axle is rusty.

Davenport has been the squeaky wheel on school funding inequity in Iowa, and the Iowa House this week tried to apply a drop of oil. Problem is, the whole axle is rusty, and cracked.

By law, 164 school districts — about half of Iowa’s 330 districts — are held $175 below the maximum per-pupil spending amount used to set local school budgets. In fact, almost 84 percent of school districts in the state are $100 or more below the maximum (graph below).

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On Tuesday, the House passed an amendment, H8291, that dealt only with the squeakiest wheel — Davenport — and only for a one-year fix.

Davenport is not buying. In a Quad-City Times story, Davenport lawmakers were not happy. Their school superintendent, Art Tate, called it “no help at all,” and for good measure, put the focus where it needs to be.

Wrote Tate in an email to the Times: “It does not address the moral imperative to make every student worth the same in Iowa.”

The larger question, given that moral imperative, is why more districts aren’t more active on this issue. One reason could be that Iowa’s inequities, while real, do not rise to the level of what might be found in other states.

Another reason might be that just fighting for basic school funding is hard enough, when the Legislature is setting a seven-year pace of funding growth below 2 percent despite faster growth in district costs, strong state revenues and approval of more business tax breaks.

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We’re in the closing days, perhaps the closing hours, of the 2016 legislative session, with exceedingly few successes for education and working families. It’s too late in this session to expect real reform of the school funding system, pleas for which have come for many years — and focus on more than the per-pupil cost. There are other equity problems, the largest of which is in funding transportation services.

The weak House attempt at a one-year fix for Davenport, however, is a sign that the squeaky wheel is being heard. Think of what might happen if more wheels squeaked.

Owen-2013-57Posted by Mike Owen, Executive Director of the nonpartisan Iowa Policy Project.
mikeowen@iowapolicyproject.org

Beyond politics: Teacher pay in context

In Iowa, the Mrs. Brown or Ms. Green who taught you was paid about the same as your kid’s teacher gets today.

Funding for Iowa schools has been under discussion for nearly the entire legislative session. The Iowa House has one version of a funding bill and the Iowa Senate has one with a higher funding level. Schools use their money for a variety of things that support the education of students from kindergarten to the senior year of high school. One obvious part of funding is teacher salaries.

During debate at the Capitol, State Representative Greg Forristall called for a salary freeze for teachers. According to Iowa Public Radio, Forristall stated in the Education Committee that farmers are expected to make 30 percent less in this coming year. “Maybe this is the year that teachers could accept last year’s salary,” he said.[1]

Also according to Iowa Public Radio, the speaker of the Iowa House, Kraig Paulsen, said teachers are bargaining for raises that cost too much money.[2]

So how have salaries changed over the years in Iowa? The National Center for Educational Statistics gathers average annual salary for teachers in public elementary and secondary schools by state going back to school year 1969-70.[3]

In that year salaries for Iowa teachers converted to present dollars averaged $51,170. In the school year 2012-13, the most recent figures, the same average teacher earned $51,528. That’s a difference of only $360 over almost 45 years.

Put another way: The Mrs. Brown or Ms. Green who taught you was paid about the same as your kid’s teacher gets today.

Secondly, Iowa average salaries are below the national average of $56,383.

Iowa teachers could go over our northern border and earn almost $5,000 more in Minnesota. On the other hand, South Dakota teachers on average earn $12,000 less. (South Dakota teachers even make less than teachers do in Mississippi.) Iowa is near the middle of average salaries for all teachers compared to other states.

When it comes to starting teacher salaries, however, Iowa ranks 33rd in the nation at $33,226.[4] We are similar to Wisconsin and Kansas. We are below Illinois and Minnesota as expected. What is surprising is that starting salaries here are almost $3,000 below Alabama and even lower than in Texas.

The disagreement in funding for schools includes many aspects. Before one should believe that teachers have bargained for too much or need a pay freeze, it might be good to look at this data.

[1] http://iowapublicradio.org/post/republican-lawmaker-freeze-teacher-salaries
[2] http://iowapublicradio.org/post/paulsen-teacher-raises-too-big
[3] http://nces.ed.gov/programs/digest/d13/tables/dt13_211.60.asp
[4] http://www.nea.org/home/2012-2013-average-starting-teacher-salary.html
IPP-osterberg-75Posted by David Osterberg, Co-founder of the Iowa Policy Project