TIF public forum draws out facts, and people

Sen. Joe Bolkcom, D-Iowa City, and Rep. Tom Sands, R-Wapello, hosted the Coralville forum about an issue growing in attention following the release of Peter Fisher’s report for the Iowa Fiscal Partnership.


The room was packed, but now more people will be able to view the January 4 public forum in Coralville about tax-increment financing.

City Channel 4 — Iowa City Cable TV — will show the forum, which features a presentation by Iowa Policy Project Research Director Peter Fisher and comments by Iowa lawmakers and local officials. Fisher’s recent report, Tax-Increment Financing: A Case Study of Johnson County, was the focus of commentary throughout the hearing.

Hosted by State Sen. Joe Bolkcom, D-Iowa City, and State Rep. Tom Sands, R-Wapello, the forum has drawn much attention including media coverage by The Gazette in Cedar Rapids and The Press-Citizen in Iowa City.

The Iowa City cable presentation of the forum will be shown six times in the coming week, beginning at midnight today. The program runs 1 hour, 49 minutes. Here is the full schedule, also found on the Channel 4 website:

Saturday, January 07, at 12:00 a.m.
Saturday, January 07, at 9:30 p.m.
Monday, January 09, at 8:00 a.m.
Tuesday, January 10, at 5:30 a.m.
Wednesday, January 11, at 4:00 p.m.
Thursday, January 12, at 1:30 p.m.

To view slides that Fisher used in his presentation, click here.

It’s not theater: ‘The Pirates of River Landing’

Total up-front project cost: $16 million to $17 million plus infrastructure. The city’s share: at least 75 percent. In the economic development world, that is an astounding fraction. That’s even larger than Iowa’s scandal ridden film tax credit.

Peter Fisher
Peter Fisher

The Coralville City Council recently approved an astounding incentive package to entice Von Maur from Iowa City’s Sycamore Mall to Coralville’s Iowa River Landing project. The city has agreed to build a $9.5 million store for Von Maur. It doesn’t matter how well your store is doing; if someone offers you free rent in perpetuity, that gets your attention.

But the $9.5 million is only half the story. The city also agreed to:

  • give Von Maur the $1.5 million building site for $10,
  • pay $650,000 to buy out the company’s lease at Sycamore Mall,
  • pay all of Von Maur’s expenses of moving from the mall to Coralville, and
  • pay all of the cost of constructing necessary streets, sidewalks, parking lots, landscaping, street lighting, water, sewer and storm sewers associated with or needed by the store.

And that’s still not the end. This was a TIF deal, where the rationale is that you are creating tax base, in the long run.

Well, guess what happens to most of the tax revenue — the city rebates it to Von Maur, with no ending date, because this TIF is in a “blighted area,” which means the TIF goes on forever.

So I guess the day after perpetuity, the schools and the county will start collecting all the taxes normally due them from this project.

The property tax deal caps Von Maur’s liability for property taxes at $150,000 per year (inflated each year by the consumer price index or 2 percent, whichever is less). If you take the building cost and add the land value you get $11 million. Then throw in another $1.0 to $1.5 million for the value of interior improvements made by Von Maur that count as part of the real estate, and you get a taxable value of about $12.2 million. At the current total property tax rate in that area of $36.57 per thousand, that is about $450,000 per year for a total property tax bill.

Under the agreement, Von Maur pays only $150,000, the city pays the remaining $300,000. There is no time limit on the cap. But if we assume that the store will have an economic life of 20 years, we can calculate the present value equivalent of giving them $300,000 a year. It’s about $4.5 million (using a 3 percent discount rate). You could argue about the time frame, or the discount rate, or about how much faster property taxes will go up than the 2 percent limit on the cap (which means the rebate amount will increase).

But you will in the end come to the conclusion that the tax cap is worth a lot — $4 million to $5 million. That is, giving Von Maur $4 million to $5 million up front would be worth about the same as giving the company $300,000 a year for 20 years. That means the total incentive package is worth at least $16 million (9.5 + 1.5 + .65 + 4.5). “At least,” because that figure doesn’t include all of the city infrastructure costs, which will be substantial, or the moving costs. Von Maur, meanwhile, has to come up with just the cost of finishing the interior space to its specifications, an expense that is likely to be in the $3.5 to $4.5 million range, plus $150,000 in property taxes each year, and its share of maintaining the common property (mostly parking lots).

Total up-front project cost: $16 million to $17 million plus infrastructure. The city’s share: at least 75 percent. In the economic development world, that is an astounding fraction. That’s even larger than Iowa’s scandal-ridden film tax credit, which briefly promised “half-price filmmaking” before the program was shut down. In addition to covering three-fourths of the up-front costs, the city will pay two-thirds of the annual property tax bill.

Coralville Council members — perhaps soon to be known as the Pirates of River Landing — apparently think this is a wise use of taxpayer funds. We can hope that the taxpayers of Coralville have a more sensible view of the world.

Posted by Peter S. Fisher, Research Director