Business tax rankings: Misinformation continues

Tax Foundation misrepresents Iowa once again.

The Tax Foundation is at it again. The corporate-funded think tank released their latest bogus measure of state tax competitiveness, the 2019 State Business Tax Climate Index (SBTCI), on October 22nd.  The major features of the SBTCI remain unchanged from earlier editions. The fundamental criticisms of their methodology remain as salient as ever.

The State Business Tax Climate Index purports to measure a state’s “tax competitiveness” but the index bears very little relationship to what businesses actually pay in taxes in one state versus another. Of the 10 supposedly “worst” states in terms of business taxation according to the latest Tax Foundation ranking, 6 (including Iowa) actually ranked among the 21 states with the lowest business taxes, including two among the lowest 10, according to of the Council on State Taxation.

The Tax Foundation ranking (they put Iowa as the 9th worst state) differs dramatically from more defensible analyses that simply measure the average effective corporate income tax rate. The Council on State Taxation produces periodic estimates of all business taxes as a share of private sector Gross State Product and has consistently found Iowa to be among a sizable group of states right in the middle. In fact, their latest report shows that only 17 states have a lower effective business tax rate than Iowa, while 30 states have a higher rate.

The SBTCI is a combination of 124 components of state tax systems, giving substantial emphasis to some components that cannot plausibly affect tax competitiveness, while ignoring features that have a large impact on business taxes (single-factor apportionment and deduction of federal corporate income taxes). The last problem is particularly salient for Iowa. Iowa offers single-factor apportionment, which can drastically reduce a corporation’s Iowa tax if they export much of their production. And Iowa is one of the few states that allow corporations to deduct part of their federal income taxes on their state return. These two features help explain why the Tax Foundation ranks us poorly while others show us with average, or lower than average, taxes on business.

There are a few changes in the 2020 version of the index. The Tax Foundation now penalizes states for attempting to rein in corporate tax avoidance in two ways. First, they penalize a state’s score if they conform to the Global Intangible Low Taxed Income (GILTI) provisions of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) of 2017, which are intended to reduce the incentive to shift corporate assets abroad. State conformity would in fact help states avoid some of the corporate tax avoidance that has been eroding state revenues, due to the ability of corporations to shift profits overseas. But restoring revenues in this way is a bad thing, according to the TF. The second new feature is a penalty for states that conform to the net interest limitation in TCJA. This provision limits the ability of corporations to deduct interest expense, but apparently the TF thinks the deduction should be unlimited.

Iowa has chosen to conform to both of those provisions, for which the state’s taxpayers should be thankful. That the Tax Foundation has penalized Iowa in the rankings for trying to close corporate loopholes is just another reason to ignore their rankings.

2010-PFw5464

 

Peter Fisher is research director of the nonpartisan Iowa Policy Project. pfisher@iowapolicyproject.org

‘Nothing to see here, folks,’ 2017 edition

What really drives state growth is the rate of new business formation. And what matters most for entrepreneurial vibrancy is the education level of the state’s residents.

slide_taxfoundation-cropBasic flaws remain in Tax Foundation business index

The Tax Foundation released the 14th edition of its State Business Tax Climate Index (SBTCI) today (Sept. 28). The basic flaws that have rendered it of little use as a guide to state economic policy remain. While a few methodological tweaks have been made, it is still a hodge-podge of over 100 different features of state tax law, mashed together into an index number. The components are weighted illogically, and the result is a ranking that bears little or no relation to the taxes businesses actually pay in one state versus another.

The Tax Foundation acknowledges that they are not measuring actual tax levels on business, but rather the states’ tax structure. But they provide no evidence that tax structure influences business decisions. If you were a business, what would you care more about: the bottom line amount you will pay, or whether there were three tax brackets or five tax brackets involved in the calculation that got you there? The Tax Foundation would have you count brackets, and ignore the dollars.

The SBTCI has separate components for the corporate income tax, the individual income tax, property taxes, etc. So let’s consider the corporate tax component. Even as a measure of “structure” somehow, it falls short because it leaves out two major determinants of corporate income tax liabilities — federal deductibility and the apportionment rule — while including numerous minor features. As a result, the corporate tax index is a meaningless number.

Furthermore, the corporate income tax is much less important than the property tax, for most businesses. According to the Council on State Taxation, the property tax accounted for 43 percent of all business taxes, the corporate income tax just 11 percent, in 2014. Yet in coming up with the overall state rankings, the latest Tax Foundation index weights the property tax 14.9 percent, the corporate income tax 19.7 percent. That makes states with high property taxes and low corporate income taxes look much better on the index than they really are, and penalizes the states with a robust corporate income tax, a high state share of education funding, and low property taxes.

To make matters worse, the index weights change every year. This makes it impossible to know if a change in a state’s rank from one year to the next is due to a change in tax law, or just a change in the weights.

More importantly, the whole focus on business tax competitiveness is misplaced. State and local taxes are a very small share of overall business costs. What really drives state growth is the rate of new business formation. And what matters most for entrepreneurial vibrancy is the education level of the state’s residents.

2010-PFw5464Editor’s Note: Peter Fisher, research director of the nonpartisan Iowa Policy Project (IPP), wrote this blog for GradingStates.org, IPP’s separate website devoted to promoting a better understanding of various state business climate rankings. For a look at components of state policies that can promote prosperity, see this page on the GradingStates.org site.