Robbing the hungry tomorrow to help the sick today?

Deficit demagogues make points in Congress, but miss the point about good recovery policy.

Andrew Cannon, research associate
Andrew Cannon

Should we rob the hungry tomorrow to help the sick today?

Economic recovery efforts should be aiding both — and other vulnerable populations — and neither at the expense of the other.

Congress is showing renewed interest in passing an extension of the temporary increase in the federal government’s share of Medicaid financing.

The proposed extension, however, could come at a steep price. To offset the cost of extending the Medicaid increase, Congress is looking at reducing Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP (formerly known as food stamps) by $6.7 billion.

Deficit demagogues may be making points in Congress, but they miss the point about good recovery policy.

It’s no secret that the federal budget deficit has grown over the past decade. But the long-term deficit is primarily due to a few select causes: the Bush tax cuts of 2001 and 2003 that heavily favored the highest earners, the deficit-financed wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, and the dip in tax revenues due to the recession.

Recession recovery efforts, such as the Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, which included the original increase in federal Medicaid payments, add a negligible amount to the long-term deficit, while providing immediate benefits to the most vulnerable Americans and stimulating the economy. An analysis of Recovery Act provisions by Mark Zandi, chief economist at Moody’s Economy and former economic adviser to Sen. John McCain’s presidential campaign, estimated that every federal dollar invested in SNAP generates $1.74 of economic activity.

Congress will need to address deficit concerns. But doing so at the expense of the most vulnerable Americans doesn’t make sense fiscally, morally or economically.

Posted by Andrew Cannon, Research Associate

Help economy, fix revenue problem

Today’s startling report from the Iowa Revenue Estimating Conference removes any doubt about the impact of the recession on top of routine tax-cutting: Iowa has a big revenue problem.

Now, more than ever, Iowa needs to put reality into the rhetoric that everything is on the table in this fiscal crisis, and that points to three immediate responses:

• Use stimulus money to restore funds already cut from the budget;

• Restore funding and avoid further cuts where possible to help the economic recovery and to keep services going at a critical time;

• Recognize that stimulus funds and tax reforms are necessary to bridge the revenue gap created by the recession.

Iowa needs to fight off the temptation to cut budgets further. Budget cuts can damage the Iowa economy, creating more layoffs, at the same time they deny needed public services when more Iowans are hurting.

REC projections today painted a more dire picture than the one that led the governor to slash spending across the board by 1.5 percent for this year and propose 6.5 percent cuts in many services for next budget year, beginning July 1.

The projections mean Iowa has a $130 million larger gap for this year, and a $270 million larger gap for fiscal year 2010. Besides addressing the current budget-year gap, the governor and legislators will have to put a fiscal 2010 budget in place assuming those REC projections.

Many Iowa Fiscal Partnership reports have detailed the revenue roots of Iowa’s current fiscal challenges. Of particular concern are the explosion in corporate tax expenditures, including many giveaways that provide no accountability to Iowa taxpayers that they money is being spent as intended, or that experience has validated that intent.

In the current situation, there can be no more excuses for ignoring the revenue side of Iowa’s budget problems. See IFP’s news release today.

Federal stimulus impacts on Iowa

Here is a look at some of the impacts of the American Recovery & Reinvestment Act in Iowa:

FMAP (Medicaid percentage increase) FY2009-11 — $550.0 million

State Fiscal Stabilization (Flexible block grant) — $ 86.0 million

Education/ Child Care:

State Fiscal Stabilization fund (education) FY2009-10$386.4 million

Title 1 (supplemental support) — $65.3 million

IDEA (special education state grants)—$120.9 million

Child Care & Development Block Grant FY2009-10 — $18.1 million

Child Support FY2009-10 — $27.2 million

Unemployment Insurance (UI):

UI Benefit Increase ($25/week) — 212,422 recipients

UI Emergency Extension to 12/09 — 27,600 new beneficiaries

Employment Services FY09:

Youth Services — $5.2 million

Dislocated Workers — $6.3 million

Adult Activities — $1.6 million

Making Work Pay Credit — 1,110,000 taxpayers

Food Stamps FY2009-13:

Benefit Increase — $161 million and 279,000 recipients

Administration — $2.7 million

Child Tax Credit (tax year 2009 — lowers threshold to make credit available to families at $3,000 earnings):

Number helped lowering $8,500 threshold — 133,000

Number helped lowering $12,550 threshold — 156,000

Emergency Shelter Grant Pgm FY091 Add’l Funds — $16.8 million and 4,500 households