Iowa Senate to families: Happy Valentine’s Day!

The increase would put Iowa into the top tier among the 22 states and the District of Columbia that offer an EITC.

Lily French
Lily French
EITC graphic
The Iowa Senate voted 48-0 on Feb. 14 to approve a significant increase in Iowa's Earned Income Tax Credit.

Today, the Iowa Senate sent a Valentine to thousands of working Iowa families, voting unanimously to approve an increase in Iowa’s Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC).

Whether the Valentine is ultimately delivered depends on the Iowa House and Governor Terry Branstad, who twice vetoed a smaller increase last year.

The Senate-passed bill would boost Iowa’s EITC, which is refundable, from 7 percent of the federal credit, to 13 percent for this year, then to 15 percent in 2013 and to 20 percent in 2014. The initial boost, to 13 percent, is expected to cost about $26 million in 2013 and $23 million each of the next three years.

No information was immediately available on the cost of moving to 15 percent and 20 percent. For comparison purposes, however, it is useful to note that Iowa gave corporations that pay no state income taxes nearly $45 million in checks last year.

In the case of those corporate subsidies, through the Research Activities Credit, there is little or no evidence of a direct benefit to Iowa’s economy nor a demonstrated need for the subsidy. The EITC, on the other hand, is shown in study after study to produce economic benefits for both local communities and working families who struggle to make ends meet in low- and moderate-wage jobs.

The increase would move Iowa from one of the lowest EITCs into the top tier among the 22 states and the District of Columbia that currently offer an EITC. Only seven states and the District of Columbia have higher credits under current law than the proposed 20 percent for Iowa. This table in a recent report by the Iowa Department of Revenue illustrates what various states offer for an EITC.

Posted by Lily French, Outreach Coordinator

New Census measure shows good policy reduces poverty

The new measure helps policymakers view the impact of public initiatives to alleviate poverty.

Andrew Cannon photo
Andrew Cannon

Working-family tax credits and food assistance are among ways public policy lifts millions of Americans out of poverty. At the same time, continued high unemployment rates and low wages have put more and more Americans into poverty.

Those are some of the inescapable conclusions from the Census Bureau’s latest information.

In order to better capture what poverty means and how public programs help (or fail) to alleviate it, the Census Bureau devised a new poverty measure.

The Supplemental Poverty Measure (SPM) does not replace the official poverty measure, which is used to determine eligibility for many public programs, but provides policymakers with another way of viewing the impact of public programs.

The SPM measures what it costs to maintain a minimal standard of living using average costs of necessities: food, rent, clothing, utilities, etc. In addition, SPM also accounts for the increase in overall well-being individuals experience as a result of public programs. Those include the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly known as Food Stamps), the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and the Low Income Heating and Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP), among others. It also accounts for the decrease in overall well-being an individual experiences through out-of-pocket medical costs, child care, child support, and other expenses.

Using the SPM, 49 million Americans, or 16 percent experienced poverty in 2010. The official poverty measure shows about 46.6 million or 15.2 percent in poverty. Among seniors, the difference is even more drastic: The official measure found 3.5 million seniors, or 9 percent in poverty in 2010; the SPM found 6.2 million or 15.9 percent in poverty.

Not all the results of the SPM are so grim, however. The SPM finds a lower rate of poverty among children than the official measure, 18.2 percent vs. 22.5 percent. As noted above, this is because the SPM accounts for the increase in income and living standard individuals experience when they benefit from public support programs.

Additionally, the SPM illustrates the effect public programs have on reducing poverty. For instance, SNAP keeps 5.2 million people, including 973,000 children, out of poverty. The EITC prevents about 6 million people, more than 1.1 million of whom are kids, from living in poverty.

On the other hand, medical out-of-pocket expenses, meaning everything from co-pays and deductibles to paying for medical services with cash or through debt, added about 10.1 million, or 3.3 percentage points, to the number of Americans in poverty.

Successful problem-solving requires that first the problem be understood. The Supplemental Poverty Measure is an important new tool for policymakers in alleviating poverty.

Posted by Andrew Cannon, Research Associate