IPP, CFPC form Common Good Iowa

A new chapter for great work by longtime partners in Iowa policy analysis — now as one organization, Common Good Iowa.

Today we have exciting news. The Iowa Policy Project has joined with our longtime partners at the Child and Family Policy Center to formally create a new organization, Common Good Iowa.

Look to Common Good Iowa for the solid research, rigorous policy analysis and focused advocacy that Iowans have come to expect from both organizations. Expect the same attention to critical issues that you have seen from IPP over two decades — and a new, invigorated approach to advancing a bold policy agenda. By joining to together we will have more capacity to coordinate our expertise on issues and communications, and wage successful campaigns to improve the lives of every person who calls Iowa home.

The creation of one organization out of two is the result of many months of discussions among board and staff members at both IPP and CFPC. We have always recognized that as each group has focused on some issues that the other has not, we share a common focus in other areas, including budget priorities and tax policy needed to fairly and adequately support those priorities. But we also have recognized that we need to connect the dots better between these many issues if we want our friends in the advocacy community to do so as well.

Common Good Iowa will, with one voice, draw attention to policy that connects these issues for the benefit of our entire community in Iowa — as we say, “the common good.”

Since the early discussions in 2000 that led to our founding in 2001, IPP has followed the vision of a “three-legged stool” for our work: economic opportunity (to include wages, jobs, education, wage theft, collective bargaining, economic development, pensions, and work supports including child care and Food Stamps); tax and budget issues, particularly tax fairness and revenue adequacy; and energy and the environment, including policy opportunities toward clean, sustainable energy choices and better water quality.

As you may know, IPP’s work on tax fairness and tax credits, as well as some of our research and advocacy on work support and safety-net programs, has been in cooperation and coordination with CFPC as the “Iowa Fiscal Partnership.” That brand on our work will go away as we are now formally one organization.

Common Good Iowa will carry on CFPC’s example as a leading advocate in Iowa on early childhood; children’s health, development and well-being; and family economic opportunity. As CFPC has done for many years, our new organization will continue to share data, link research to policy and promote best practices for improving child well-being as part of the nationwide Kids Count initiative.

Every staff member for both IPP and CFPC has a place in the new organization. Anne Discher, who has served as executive director of CFPC, will be the executive director of Common Good Iowa, headquartered in Des Moines. We will retain an Iowa City office, with IPP executive director Mike Owen becoming deputy director of Common Good Iowa. I invite you to reach out to Anne or Mike if you have questions about this new arrangement.

The name “Common Good Iowa” was chosen after great deliberation among staff and board of both organizations. It reflects our vision of public policy in Iowa. Philosophers, economists and political scientists have long debated and defined the common good, and there’s a powerful theme that links those conversations: public systems and structures for the benefit of all people, achieved through collective action in policymaking and public service. It feels utterly right for our new endeavor.

This is a great opportunity to reimagine our work. We’re at a moment when the devastating impact of racism, intolerance in our civic discussions, and years of neglect of our public systems have been laid bare for all to see. No Iowa community can thrive when some community members are systemically deprived of opportunity by our health, educational, human service and justice systems. We must do better.

As a largely white organization, we pledge to listen to and learn from our partners of color around our state, and to be not be just not racist, but, to borrow from scholar Dr. Ibram X. Kendi, to be anti-racist: to actively advance concrete policies and practices to dismantle the persistent inequities experienced by Black, Latinx, Asian, Native and other marginalized communities. We also commit to the internal work to become an organization that itself is attractive to a diverse, talented staff.

The merger is official now, although we will be putting finishing touches on our new brand over the next months. You’ll be hearing more about how you can celebrate virtually with us when we unveil our new logo, website, social channels and policy roadmap later in the year.

Until then you can reach Common Good Iowa staff at their existing CFPC and IPP email addresses, websites and social media accounts.

Sincerely,

Janet Carl

Vice President, Common Good Iowa Board of Directors
Former President, Iowa Policy Project Board of Directors

A Roadmap for Opportunity: It’s Time to Put Iowa on the Right Path

At this critical juncture, Iowa can take the high road to shared prosperity, or go down a dead end.

181009-roadmap-logoIowa can unlock the potential of each individual and allow all workers to share in the fruits of their labor by making public investments in the foundations of a strong economy. Well-resourced schools, access to higher education, decent wages and protections, economic supports, clean water and renewable energy, and a cleaned-up tax system, all can pave the way to opportunities and broadly shared prosperity that Iowans want.

Unfortunately, policy choices have put us on a road that prioritizes corporate profits over worker wages and corporate tax cuts over the public investments that allow for a strong, sustainable economy. We are at a crossroads and our policy choices today and in the near future can either pave the path to economic opportunity in every corner of our state, or create roadblocks to prosperity for everyday Iowans.

Our people-first roadmap offers the way forward. It lays out the evidence-based, responsible solutions to our state’s most pressing issues, pinpointing several stops along the way that would mark progress for our state, such as:

pinCreating the workforce of our future and ensuring our children reach their potential. Iowa can and should ensure K-12 schools receive the funding they need for every child to succeed, no matter where they live. We also must restore our commitment to higher education with more state support, lower tuition, and aid to reduce student debt.

pinBoosting economic security and supports for working Iowans. Giving Iowans’ lowest wage workers a long overdue raise, ensuring workers get paid what they’re legally owed, shoring up our system of compensation for workers who get hurt on the job, and restoring worker rights to collective bargaining can ensure that all Iowa workers are getting a fair deal. Iowans also need a boost in child care assistance, which can make or break the ability of a family to work.

pinRestoring a public commitment to the health and well-being of every Iowan, particularly seniors and people living with disabilities. Reversing the privatization of Medicaid and pursuing cost savings through innovation and efficiency rather than reduced services and worker wages are critical steps to ensuring access to health care for all Iowans — now and in the future.

pinEnsuring clean water and renewable energy for a healthy, sustainable Iowa. We can and must balance the state’s need for clean and abundant water with our agricultural economy by reducing water pollution. Likewise, Iowa should restore its legacy of leadership in renewable and efficient energy in order to create a cleaner, greener state for future generations.

pinCleaning up and restoring balance to the tax code. Right now, Iowa asks the lowest income Iowans to pay a higher share of their income in state and local taxes than those with the highest incomes. We can fix this by cleaning up corporate tax loopholes that squander precious public dollars that could otherwise be invested in shared opportunity for Iowans.

Iowa is at a critical juncture. We can take the high road that leads to progress and shared prosperity, or go down a dead end. The policies in this roadmap provide a clear route to a stronger Iowa. For more detail on each stop on the roadmap, please click here.

Assuring opportunity for all Iowans

New Census data highlight the need for Iowa policymakers to ensure that all can fully contribute to Iowa’s economy

New Census data highlights a slight decline in Iowa’s overall poverty rate, though not all racial groups benefited from this advance. Stagnating household incomes and poverty rates among working Iowa families of color over the past 10 years mean that economic gains aren’t broadly shared among racial groups in Iowa.[i]

180915-MedianIncome_Race_IA

Ways that the Iowa Legislature could strengthen economic security for families of color include:

  • expanding the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC);
  • ensuring that high-income Iowans and corporations pay their fair share of taxes;
  • raising the minimum wage; and
  • investing in preschool and K-12 education.[ii]

In recent days, the U.S. Census Bureau released new 2017 data covering poverty, income, and health insurance coverage.

Iowa showed a slight decrease in family and child poverty rates and an increase in household incomes. The outdated poverty guidelines fail to capture what it really takes to get by in Iowa.[iii] Our Cost of Living in Iowa research builds basic needs budgets for multiple family types across Iowa. Our 2018 analysis found that 30 percent of black working households and 28 percent of Latino households were unable to meet basic needs. This compares to 16 percent of white households.[iv]

The median household income for black Iowa families was about half of white family household incomes in 2017. White households are the only group who saw a statistically significant increase in household income over the past 10 years. Poverty rates declined for white and Latino Iowans between 2016 and 2017. However, poverty rates for black, Asian, Pacific Islander, and Native American Iowans have remained the same.[v]

Communities of color in Iowa continue to face barriers to economic prosperity. These include structural factors such as hiring discrimination and a lack access to quality jobs, great schools, and convenient transportation. Latino and Black families are disproportionately low-income. Further, they pay a larger portion of their income in sales and property taxes relative to more affluent Iowans.[vi]

Moving to a less regressive statewide tax system for families while closing corporate tax loopholes to assure stronger investments for all Iowans would work to dismantle some of the barriers to economic success for all Iowans and particularly families of color, who the latest data show are disproportionately impacted.

Expanding the EITC and raising the minimum wage would contribute to more broadly shared prosperity, as would restoring Iowa’s traditional commitment to education. Education funding in Iowa has lagged in K-12 and opportunities to advance in college are threatened by state cuts in support. Iowans and their leaders should be looking to solutions that improve equity and opportunity for a new generation of Iowans.[vii]

[i] U.S. Census Bureau, “Poverty Status in the Past 12 Months.” September 2018. American Community Survey 1-year estimates. factfinder.census.gov/

[ii] Erica Williams, “States Should Adopt Policies to Help Dismantle Racial Barriers to Broader Prosperity.” September 2018. The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. https://www.cbpp.org/blog/states-should-adopt-policies-to-help-dismantle-racial-barriers-to-broader-prosperity

[iii] Ibid.

[iv] Peter Fisher and Natalie Veldhouse, “The Cost of Living in Iowa 2018 Edition Part 2: Many Iowa Households Struggle to Meet Basic Needs.” July 2018. Iowa Policy Project. http://iowapolicyproject.org/2018docs/180702-COL2018-Part2.pdf

[v] Ibid.

[vi] Ibid.

[vii] Ibid.

2018-NV-6w_3497(1)Natalie Veldhouse is a research associate at the nonpartisan Iowa Policy Project. nveldhouse@iowapolicyproject.org