Anti-taxers don’t get ‘competitiveness’

Iowa is a low-tax state for business, and has been for some time. Two leading business consulting firms have demonstrated this.

slide_taxfoundation-cropHere we go again. Whenever Iowa legislators or lobbyists want to cut taxes for business, or for high-income individuals, they trot out the same myth about competitiveness.

The reality is pretty simple: Iowa is a low-tax state for business, and has been for some time. Late last year, the Council on State Taxation released its latest report on how much businesses pay in state and local taxes, prepared by the accounting firm Ernst and Young. Iowa was 18th lowest — only 17 states had a lower overall tax rate on business.[1] (See graph.) Another accounting firm, Anderson Economic Group, ranks Iowa’s business taxes even lower, at 14th — only 13 states have lower taxes.[2]

But why use real data when you can just cite some anti-tax, anti-government think tank that has cobbled together a “competitiveness index” that makes Iowa look bad?

So it is again in 2020. The governor cited the need to be competitive in her condition of the state address, and the Senate president repeated the theme. To support the claim, Senator Charles Schneider pointed to a bogus study by the Tax Foundation that ranked Iowa 42nd among the states in “business tax climate.” Only eight states were worse.

The Tax Foundation, it turns out, mashes together 124 components of state tax systems to produce an overall “index number” to rank the states. Their index is meaningless; it gives weight to components that cannot plausibly affect tax competitiveness, while ignoring features that have a large impact on business taxes.[3]

The last problem is particularly salient for Iowa. Iowa offers single-factor apportionment, which can drastically reduce a corporation’s Iowa tax if they export much of their production. And Iowa is one of the few states that allow corporations to deduct part of their federal income taxes on their state return. Both of these factors are completely ignored by the Tax Foundation. Instead, they focus on things like the number of tax brackets. Meanwhile, the sales taxation of food is a good thing, in their book; Iowa’s failure to tax food somehow makes us less competitive. This is nonsense.

Iowa is a slow growing state, but more tax cuts for those at the top will not help. They will further erode the state’s ability to invest in our roads and bridges, in our children and our workforce, the building blocks of a strong economy. Education, from early childhood through college, not only produces the skilled workforce businesses need, but makes it easier to attract workers from elsewhere, knowing their children will get a good education.

[1] Business taxes as a percent of GSP. Ernst & Young LLP, Total state and local business taxes, October 2019. Table 4, page 12. https://www.cost.org/globalassets/cost/state-tax-resources-pdf-pages/cost-studies-articles-reports/1909-3269660_50-state-tax-2019-final.pdf

[2] Business taxes as a share of business pre-tax operating surplus. Anderson Economic Group LLC, June 2018. 2018 State Business Tax Burden Rankings, Exhibit I, page 17. https://www.andersoneconomicgroup.com/wp-content/uploads/AEGBusinessTaxBurdenStudy_2018_FINAL.pdf

[3] For a more detailed critique of the Tax Foundation’s ranking, and others, see “Grading the States: Business Climate Rankings and the Real Path to Prosperity.” http://www.gradingstates.org/

2010-PFw5464Peter Fisher, research director of the nonpartisan Iowa Policy Project in Iowa City, is professor emeritus in the University of Iowa School of Urban and Regional Planning. His widely cited Grading the States analysis is at gradingstates.org. pfisher@iowapolicyproject.org

Tying science to policy — for Iowa

Iowans can do better for the environment and should.

160915-59170_dox35x45The Iowa Policy Project has always enlisted the help of students and professors or former professors from Iowa colleges to help produce good research.

IPP founder and researcher David Osterberg, left, in his job as a professor of Public Health at the UI, has been part of the annual statement on climate change signed by researchers and teachers at all the colleges and universities in Iowa.

This year’s statement, released today with 187 signers from 39 Iowa colleges and universities, is about farming to sequester carbon and improve water quality: The Multiple Benefits of Climate-Smart Agriculture.

An excerpt:

Farmers and land managers who have implemented proven conservation practices have positioned Iowa to lead implementation of Climate‐Smart Agriculture. Iowa’s leadership through wider adoption of conservation practices will benefit our state, while these practices lessen human contribution to net greenhouse gas emissions. …

We, as Iowa educators, believe Iowa should play a leadership role in this vital effort, just as our state has already done for wind energy.

Find the full statement here.

Find the news release here.

The statement envisions “a multi‐faceted vision for land stewardship by vigorously implementing federal, state, and other conservation programs” to generate a more diverse landscape. It concludes:

Such a landscape would benefit all Iowans by transforming Iowa’s vast croplands into resources that simultaneously generate food, feed, fuel, a healthier climate, better soils, wildlife habitat, and cleaner waters.

The lead authors are Chris Anderson, who has served as assistant director of Iowa State University’s climate science program, and Jerry Schnoor, co-director of the UI Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research, with editorial assistance from senior science writer Connie Mutel of the UI.

Also contributing were: Gene Takle, Diane Debinski and David Swenson, ISU; David Courard-Hauri, Drake; Neil Bernstein, Mount Mercy; Peter Thorne, Greg Carmichael, Elizabeth Stone and David Osterberg, UI; and Kamyar Enshayan, University of Northern Iowa.

The issues raised in this statement fit well with our work at the Iowa Policy Project. We produce papers on water quality and confined animal agriculture, and connect these issues to public policy impacts. What we do at this small policy institute fits into larger questions addressed by academics and policy people in the state.

Iowans can do better for the environment and should.

‘Nothing to see here, folks,’ 2017 edition

What really drives state growth is the rate of new business formation. And what matters most for entrepreneurial vibrancy is the education level of the state’s residents.

slide_taxfoundation-cropBasic flaws remain in Tax Foundation business index

The Tax Foundation released the 14th edition of its State Business Tax Climate Index (SBTCI) today (Sept. 28). The basic flaws that have rendered it of little use as a guide to state economic policy remain. While a few methodological tweaks have been made, it is still a hodge-podge of over 100 different features of state tax law, mashed together into an index number. The components are weighted illogically, and the result is a ranking that bears little or no relation to the taxes businesses actually pay in one state versus another.

The Tax Foundation acknowledges that they are not measuring actual tax levels on business, but rather the states’ tax structure. But they provide no evidence that tax structure influences business decisions. If you were a business, what would you care more about: the bottom line amount you will pay, or whether there were three tax brackets or five tax brackets involved in the calculation that got you there? The Tax Foundation would have you count brackets, and ignore the dollars.

The SBTCI has separate components for the corporate income tax, the individual income tax, property taxes, etc. So let’s consider the corporate tax component. Even as a measure of “structure” somehow, it falls short because it leaves out two major determinants of corporate income tax liabilities — federal deductibility and the apportionment rule — while including numerous minor features. As a result, the corporate tax index is a meaningless number.

Furthermore, the corporate income tax is much less important than the property tax, for most businesses. According to the Council on State Taxation, the property tax accounted for 43 percent of all business taxes, the corporate income tax just 11 percent, in 2014. Yet in coming up with the overall state rankings, the latest Tax Foundation index weights the property tax 14.9 percent, the corporate income tax 19.7 percent. That makes states with high property taxes and low corporate income taxes look much better on the index than they really are, and penalizes the states with a robust corporate income tax, a high state share of education funding, and low property taxes.

To make matters worse, the index weights change every year. This makes it impossible to know if a change in a state’s rank from one year to the next is due to a change in tax law, or just a change in the weights.

More importantly, the whole focus on business tax competitiveness is misplaced. State and local taxes are a very small share of overall business costs. What really drives state growth is the rate of new business formation. And what matters most for entrepreneurial vibrancy is the education level of the state’s residents.

2010-PFw5464Editor’s Note: Peter Fisher, research director of the nonpartisan Iowa Policy Project (IPP), wrote this blog for GradingStates.org, IPP’s separate website devoted to promoting a better understanding of various state business climate rankings. For a look at components of state policies that can promote prosperity, see this page on the GradingStates.org site.