Education pays in Iowa

Lily French
Lily French

Give people access to higher education and a myriad of benefits will surface for individuals and the state of Iowa.

Our new report on the return on investment of workforce education shows the benefits and potential benefits from such investments.

At each level of education beyond high school, Iowans work and earn more. For example, those with a bachelor’s degree earn on average $7.26 more an hour than those with only a high school diploma. Families headed by a parent with a college education are also much less likely to live in poverty — and better set to recover in hard times from a job loss.

So, whether you look at unemployment rates, wages, or poverty, it is undeniable that education pays for Iowans. It also pays for the state, because better-educated people on balance earn more, and pay more in taxes, which benefits the state budget.

Our analysis finds that investing in postsecondary education for low-income adults returns tax revenue more than double the state’s program costs. The return: $3.70 in increased tax revenue for every dollar invested in an associate’s degree for low-income adults, and $2.40 for every dollar invested in a bachelor’s degree.

Other strong reasons support investments now in workforce education:

  • First, the declinine in wages for less-educated workers means more Iowa families are struggling to cover basic living expenses;
  • Second, Iowa will face a labor shortage in the future due to our state’s slow population growth and the impending retirements of the baby boom generation; and
  • Third, employers in Iowa had already identified a shortage of a skilled workers as a problem before the recession, and the top 10 fasting growing occupations in our state all demand workers with postsecondary education.

To summarize, Iowa needs an increase in skilled workers to grow our economy after the recession ends and families in Iowa need higher wages to fully support themselves.

With forward-thinking policy moves now, Iowa can increase education and training opportunities for low-income adults, improving their futures and those of all Iowans who will benefit from a stronger economy.

Posted by Lily French, Research Associate

IPP Open House packs ’em in

Christine Ralston
Christine Ralston

Wow, what an event. Friday afternoon, the Iowa Policy Project hosted an open house and FRIENDraiser at our new office in Old Brick.

We packed the office with friends and supporters. Guests had the opportunity to meet and talk with IPP staff, old IPP staff greeted longtime friends and new staffers were able to meet many of IPP’s friends and supporters.

The event was an opportunity for IPP to show off our new, spacious office. The organization has increased from five to nine staff members in just two years, so our old space was getting a bit cozy.

Our new space has several private offices, a research room and a separate conference room which was dedicated in honor of IPP co-founder Mark Smith.

Mark helped found IPP in 2001 in collaboration with IPP’s Executive Director, David Osterberg. Mark is perhaps best known as former president of the Iowa Federation of Labor, AFL-CIO. For 34 years, Mark worked tirelessly in education, organizing and advocacy for Iowa’s working families.

A short presentation included remarks by David about IPP history and Mark’s contribution to the organization as well as Mark’s remarks about the founding, work and expansion of the Iowa Policy Project.

David Osterberg speaks at IPP's Open House
David Osterberg speaks at IPP's Open House

The event was open to the public. Attendees included past and present members of the IPP board, friends and supporters of IPP’s work and several of our nearby elected officials: Congressman Dave Loebsack, State Senator Joe Bolkcom of Iowa City, State Representative Nate Willems of Mount Vernon, and Johnson County Supervisor Rod Sullivan.

Many, many thanks to those of you who took the time to come and speak with us, see our new offices and make donations in support of our work. We truly appreciate it.

Posted by Christine Ralston, Research Associate