IPP Open House packs ’em in

Christine Ralston
Christine Ralston

Wow, what an event. Friday afternoon, the Iowa Policy Project hosted an open house and FRIENDraiser at our new office in Old Brick.

We packed the office with friends and supporters. Guests had the opportunity to meet and talk with IPP staff, old IPP staff greeted longtime friends and new staffers were able to meet many of IPP’s friends and supporters.

The event was an opportunity for IPP to show off our new, spacious office. The organization has increased from five to nine staff members in just two years, so our old space was getting a bit cozy.

Our new space has several private offices, a research room and a separate conference room which was dedicated in honor of IPP co-founder Mark Smith.

Mark helped found IPP in 2001 in collaboration with IPP’s Executive Director, David Osterberg. Mark is perhaps best known as former president of the Iowa Federation of Labor, AFL-CIO. For 34 years, Mark worked tirelessly in education, organizing and advocacy for Iowa’s working families.

A short presentation included remarks by David about IPP history and Mark’s contribution to the organization as well as Mark’s remarks about the founding, work and expansion of the Iowa Policy Project.

David Osterberg speaks at IPP's Open House
David Osterberg speaks at IPP's Open House

The event was open to the public. Attendees included past and present members of the IPP board, friends and supporters of IPP’s work and several of our nearby elected officials: Congressman Dave Loebsack, State Senator Joe Bolkcom of Iowa City, State Representative Nate Willems of Mount Vernon, and Johnson County Supervisor Rod Sullivan.

Many, many thanks to those of you who took the time to come and speak with us, see our new offices and make donations in support of our work. We truly appreciate it.

Posted by Christine Ralston, Research Associate

Iowa reaches towering point on wind

Teresa Galluzzo
Teresa Galluzzo

Today the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA) released its annual rankings. These rankings showed Iowa moved up to second in the nation for installed wind capacity, after installing close to 1,600 MW in 2008. Iowa had a total installed 2,791 capacity of megawatts by year-end 2008, equal to 11 percent of the nation’s total wind capacity.

The Iowa Policy Project issued its own report this morning, to fill in some of the details about Iowa’s outstanding growth. The most impressive is that according to new estimates by the Iowa Utilities Board, wind fuels about 15 percent of the electricity generated in Iowa. This is a big increase from the 5 percent wind-powered generation estimated in 2006.

With this big jump, Iowa is now a world leader in the percent of electricity generated from wind power. To find comparable examples of wind production, we must look across the ocean to European countries. According to AWEA, Denmark leads the world, producing more than 20 percent of its electricity from wind energy.

Growth in wind production in Iowa, 1998-2008
Growth in wind production in Iowa, 1998-2008

Iowa’s outstanding growth in wind production calls into question the common argument that the costs of reducing our greenhouse gas emissions and addressing climate change are too high to justify action.

Looking at Iowa’s electricity prices since 1998 — the year before Iowa’s wind boom began — our electricity prices have remained below the national average and in fact have not increased as quickly as the national average price in the last three years (2005 to 2007). Assuming a somewhat similar portion of the wind-generated electricity produced in Iowa was actually consumed in Iowa, wind’s great expansion did not cause prices to spike.

Even as Iowa is leading the way in producing electricity from wind power, significant room remains to reduce our greenhouse gas emissions by increasing our use of renewable energy sources. On the upper boundaries, AWEA estimates that Iowa has the potential to generate 62,900 megawatts from wind power.

The new estimates of Iowa’s outstanding wind production, and its potential for new wind production, show that Iowans need not fear taking strong steps to address climate change. In fact, while still being thoughtful, Iowa should rapidly enact policies that continue to help our renewable energy production grow.

Posted by Teresa Galluzzo, Research Associate

Such a small change

David Osterberg
David Osterberg

Construction of big hog-producing facilities known as CAFOs is regulated by the Iowa Department of Natural Resources, but not very well. A few Iowa legislators have recognized that and are calling for a small change in the process to approve a CAFO and provide for disposing of the manure.

A study by the Iowa Policy Project last November demonstrated the legislatively imposed shortcomings of the present approval process. The proposed legislation, HSB168, would make a small improvement by shining more light on the process and allowing neighbors the ability to comment to their local county supervisors about shortcomings in plans for the proposed CAFO and its tons of manure.

The proposed bill would not allow the supervisors to stop a project but it would give more information to the Iowa DNR and its citizen bosses on the Environmental Protection Commission. That information might be used to modify plans for locating the facility and providing for manure disposal.

This small step would give neighbors another way to influence a change in their neighborhood.

Posted by David Osterberg, Executive Director