Iowa’s employment apocalypse

As daunting as we may find the new unemployment claims numbers, they understate the true scale of the damage to the economy.

This morning, the Department of Labor released the count of new weekly claims for unemployment insurance, marking the second week of claims reflecting the employment impact of the COVID-19 crisis. The numbers are staggering, not just for their scope but for their suddenness. Most downturns in the business cycle occur gradually over a number of months; this spike has occurred in just a couple of weeks. These numbers are also the best metric we have in this unfolding crisis, providing us a near real-time measure that the April jobs report (with a March 12 reference point) will largely miss.

Nationally, new claims for the week ending March 21 were 3.28 million; last week we added another 6.65 million new claims — a total fully 10 times the previous weekly peak. In the week ending March 21, Iowa fielded 40,952 claims for unemployment insurance; in the week ending March 28, we added another 58,453. The total over the last two weeks — almost 100,000 new claims — is about the same number of new claims filed in the first four months of the Great Recession. The graph below plots weekly claims since 2007, the Great Recession indicated by the grey shading.

These numbers, of course, understate the true scale of the damage. Those ineligible for regular unemployment insurance — including the self-employed, gig workers, independent contractors, and new entrants to the labor market) do not show up in the claims data — although this will change once the federal Pandemic Unemployment Assistance Program kicks in. And the underemployed, those who are hanging on to whatever hours they can get, are also uncounted here.

And Iowa is not alone. In a longer post at Dissent, I plot all the state numbers: Off-the-charts rates of new claims over the past two weeks are evident in almost all states — but especially in those with a high share of leisure and hospitality workers, and those hard hit by the pandemic itself. California logged 186,000 new claims in the week ending March 21; and added almost five times as many (878,000) this week. New claims in Louisiana, as a telling measure of the mess many states are in, spiked on March 21 to the same level (over 70,000) as those made in the immediate wake of Hurricane Katrina — and this past week added another 97,000 claims.

The best numbers we have show that Iowa and the nation will see a lot of economic harm. It is essential to help all workers now.

Colin Gordon is a professor of history at the University of Iowa, and senior research consultant at the Iowa Policy Project. He has authored or co-authored IPP’s State of Working Iowa series and several other IPP reports on issues affecting working families, jobs, pay and benefits.

Author: iowapolicypoints

Iowa Policy Points is a blog of Common Good Iowa, a new organization built on a collective 50 years of experience of two respected Iowa organizations — the Child and Family Policy Center and the Iowa Policy Project. Learn more at www.commongoodiowa.org.

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