Work supports put Iowans ahead

Legislators are proposing costly, punitive rules for food and medical care that will fail to encourage work or boost health and financial security for low-income families.

Multiple bills moving through the Iowa Legislature attempt to take food and medical care away from Iowans. SF430 and HF2030 seek to impose harsh work requirements and a redundant eligibility verification system. Both of these costly proposals would needlessly expand bureaucracy while failing to enable work, financial security or health for Iowans.

Instead of promoting better circumstances for workers, work requirements do the opposite. They push families off of vital programs such as Medicaid and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) — even though access to adequate medical care and food is important for finding and maintaining employment.

Analysis by the Legislature’s nonpartisan fiscal staff in 2019 estimated that imposing parental work requirements on SNAP participants would add $2.5 million in administrative costs in the year implemented, followed by an ongoing annual cost of half a million dollars per year.[1]

Pushing an additional eligibility verification system would have cost $25 million per year after an initial $16 million in FY2020 to hire more than 520 state employees to verify eligibility for Iowans on work support programs including Medicaid and SNAP, according to another 2019 Legislative Services Agency fiscal note.[2] 

The sole result of such bills, if enacted, will be to get Iowans off of work-support programs — not to encourage work. IPP’s latest “Cost of Living in Iowa” analysis found that work-support programs such as SNAP and Medicaid are instrumental in helping Iowa working families bridge the gap between take-home earnings and basic needs. With 1 in 5 Iowa working households unable to meet basic needs on income alone, promoting access to work supports is important.[3]

Policies that enable work and economic prosperity include raising the minimum wage, expanding eligibility for Child Care Assistance, expanding family leave, and investing in job skills training. SF430 and HF2030 would penalize Iowans that are having difficulty making ends meet, in an economy with many low-wage jobs and inadequate benefits.

Remember, taking away food, prescriptions and doctor’s visits from Iowans in no way promotes work.

[1] Jess Benson, “SF 430 – Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), Parent Work Requirements” March 2019. Legislative Services Agency. https://www.legis.iowa.gov/docs/publications/FN/1039301.pdf

[2] Jess Benson, “Fiscal Note: SF 334 – Medicaid, Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) Eligibility Verification.” February 2019. Iowa Legislative Services Agency. https://www.legis.iowa.gov/docs/publications/FN/1038439.pdf

[3] Peter Fisher and Natalie Veldhouse, “Strengthening Pathways to the Middle Class: The Role of Work Supports. The Cost of Living in Iowa 2019 Edition, Supplement.” January 2020. Iowa Policy Project. http://iowapolicyproject.org/2020docs/200108-COL2.pdf

2018-NV-6w_3497(1)Natalie Veldhouse is a research associate at the nonpartisan Iowa Policy Project.

nveldhouse@iowapolicyproject.org

 

 

Author: iowapolicypoints

Iowa Policy Points is a blog of Common Good Iowa, a new organization built on a collective 50 years of experience of two respected Iowa organizations — the Child and Family Policy Center and the Iowa Policy Project. Learn more at www.commongoodiowa.org.

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