Alliant proposal: Equity, efficiency failure

The proposed Alliant rate increase is a sweeping denial of equitable treatment of customers and a rejection of environmental responsibility.

Alliant Energy, called Interstate Power and Light (IPL) in Iowa, is proposing a nearly 25 percent increase in its basic service rate. Since Alliant divides its charges to customers into energy, transmission, and basic service, the total bill increase will not be that large but it is a pretty big increase.

Since electric utilities are monopolies, some entity needs to “regulate” their actions. In Iowa this is the role of the Iowa Utilities Board (IUB), which must decide on the rate increase. The IUB can certainly reduce the proposed rate and can change the way IPL wants to charge individual customers.

Several electricity users in the Decorah area (the city of Decorah, Luther College, Winneshiek Energy District, and others). formed the Decorah Area Group (DAG) and intervened before the IUB to challenge the proposed rate increase. I wrote testimony on rate design for the DAG, and the following is the conclusion of my testimony:

It is apparent to me that IPL’s overriding desire is to sell more electricity at exactly the wrong times. The Company proposes in this case to:

•    Raise the Basic Customer Charge, which is already much higher than that of the other investor-owned electric company in the state; [$13.00 compared to $8.50 charged by MidAmerican Energy. Low-income customers use less electricity so boosting this charge hits them hardest.]

•    Reintroduce declining block rates during the summer peak period, which will likely cause IPL to add capacity for its system; [few utilities give large residential users a break for using more electricity in the summer and so again the smallest users — low income and conservationists are hurt again by this proposal.]

•    Discourage the production of solar power, when encouraging development of solar generation might help IPL to avoid adding generation do accommodate the super peak days; and,

•    Refrain from introducing a “super” off-peak rate that could redirect demand away from peak periods. [Their new meters allow them to make electricity really cheap around midnight so customers could charge electric cars or big capacity water heaters, but they aren’t doing it.]

These proposals, combined with IPL’s actions to convince the Iowa General Assembly to completely bypass the Board and greatly dismantle the state’s energy efficiency programs [in 2017], compels the conclusion that IPL wants to sell more power — not less — especially during the times of the day when IPL’s system is more costly to operate so that IPL will reap more profits.

As noted in the testimony, the Alliant/IPL proposal goes backward on both equity and energy efficiency, which are responsibilities of the IUB to ensure.

IUB’s own mission states that it “regulates utilities to ensure that reasonably priced, reliable, environmentally responsible, and safe utility services are available to all Iowans.” Note — “all Iowans.” This is IUB’s own assurance to even the least-powerful among us that they will be protected in the monopoly marketplace for electricity.

State law [476.1(5)] demands that the IUB “promote the use of energy efficiency strategies by gas and electric utilities required to be rate-regulated.” The Alliant proposal, by contrast, is a recipe for energy inefficiency.

The IUB has limited latitude to deny this rate increase. However, this rate increase is such a sweeping denial of equitable treatment of customers and a rejection of environmental responsibility that they might. The decision will only come after months of more filings and hearings. Stay tuned.

David Osterberg is co-founder and former executive director of the nonpartisan Iowa Policy Project. He is a former state legislator and is IPP’s lead researcher on energy and environment issues.

dosterberg@iowapolicyproject.org

Science change and climate change

Science is ever changing. It is now possible to show that some of the increase in rainfall from storms and consequent flooding has a human fingerprint.

Science is getting better, and that is bad news for climate change deniers.

Only two years ago when I last taught a climate change course at the University of Iowa, I informed students that claiming any extreme weather event came from changes in the climate was too uncertain.

Now, that view needs revising. After working with Dr. James Boulter, professor of Chemistry in the Watershed Institute for Collaborative Environmental Studies at the University of Wisconsin–Eau Claire, I have learned more.

The Iowa Policy Project worked with the Environmental Defense Fund to have Professor Boulter produce a report on climate change and flooding in Iowa. Working on this paper, I read material from the last three years that that brought me up to date on science’s ability to attribute extreme weather events to greenhouse gas effects on the climate.

Here is one source for my new understanding of what is known as “event attribution.” It is a statement from a report of the state of science relating to climate change and its physical impacts, in the Fourth National Climate Assessment (NCA4), by the U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP).[1]

“…(T)he science of event attribution is rapidly advancing, including the understanding of the mechanisms that produce extreme events and the rapid progress in development of methods used for event attribution.”

Attribution has also been a subject addressed in a recent report of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine.[2]

Science is ever changing. It is now possible to show that some of the increase in rainfall from storms and consequent flooding has a human fingerprint. We should not deny that, even as fossil-fuel supporters recklessly deny the existence of climate change or that we can already see its effects.

As Professor Boulter stated in his conclusion to the IPP report, “Now, as national politics begin to inundate Iowa’s media landscape — much as the floodwaters overran the physical landscape — it is crucial that science-informed discussions of policy responses to climate change be prominent in our personal conversations, candidates’ political statements and debates, and our community discussions across all forms of media.”

 

[1] Fourth National Climate Assessment (NCA4), by the U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP). https://science2017.globalchange.gov/chapter/3/

[2] National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine: “Attribution of Extreme Weather Events in the Context of Climate Change,” 2016. https://www.nap.edu/read/21852/chapter/1#x

David Osterberg is founder and former executive director of the nonpartisan Iowa Policy Project and is IPP’s lead researcher on the environment and energy issues. He is professor emeritus of occupational and environmental health at the University of Iowa.

dosterberg@iowapolicyproject.org