Running against the wind?

In his visit to Cedar Rapids, President Trump rallied his supporters on many issues including energy production. His message Wednesday was not a typical one in wind-producing Iowa.

The President highlighted the opening of a coal mine in Pennsylvania last month as an example of how he was bringing back the coal industry. “I don’t want to just hope the wind blows to light up your house and your factory as the birds fall to the ground,” he stated.

Concern for the fate of avian wildlife is refreshing for a president who recently rolled back regulations that prohibit the dumping of excess spoil into streams near surface mining operations, and who proposed drastic cuts to the budget of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Given a frequently stated concern of the president — for job creation — he might want to acquaint himself with the economic value of wind energy production in Iowa.

On March 30, 2017, the Iowa Policy Project reported that Iowa produces more electricity from wind per capita than any other state, and has lower average electric rates than when the industry started. Our findings show that the state’s leadership in renewable energy production has not come at great expense to ratepayers.

“Contrary to some of the warnings we heard two decades ago, the growth of wind power to 36 percent of the electricity we use in Iowa has not hurt our competitiveness in attracting businesses. It has not hurt our efforts to keep household spending for electricity under control,” said IPP’s founder and lead environmental researcher, David Osterberg.

Additionally, the wind energy industry provides well-paying jobs that support a number of families in rural Iowa where local economies are hurting. A technician salary starts at $24.50 per hour, which is very good money in rural Iowa. See IPP’s 2003 report, “Wind Power and Iowa Economy.” It found:

“Wind-powered electricity adds slightly more jobs and economic output to the Iowa economy than coal and natural gas. Furthermore, this homegrown source of electricity offers a new cash crop to farmers, spurs the development of new industries (such as turbine manufacturers and maintenance companies) as well as existing industries, and provides stable energy prices.”

While U.S. coal industry is on the decline both in production and consumption, the wind energy industry keeps growing worldwide.

Wind energy might just be an answer President Trump is looking for.

2017-sg-166177Posted by Sarah Garvin, IPP Research Associate

sgarvin@iowapolicyproject.org

Author: iowapolicypoints

The Iowa Policy Project is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization that provides research and analysis to engage Iowans in state policy decisions. We focus on tax and busget issues, the Iowa economy, and energy and environmental policy. By providing a foundation of fact-based, objective research and engaging the public in an informed discussion of policy alternatives, IPP advances effective, accountable and fair government.

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