Watching Iowa jobs: Don’t miss the deficit

Given that the population of Iowa has grown, it makes sense that more jobs need to be added to keep up. Our job deficit is almost 48,000.

Iowa’s up-again, down-again job picture is looking up again, at least for now. The May numbers from the state show an increase of 6,200 jobs. Coming on the heels of a 3,700 increase in April, this marks the first two-month gain since the end of last year, and the increase is the largest since last October.

One-month results, however, do not tell the whole story of what’s happening in the state economy and the job market. Over the past year, Iowa has averaged a gain of about 2,100 jobs per month, which is a modest pace. At this rate it would take about three years for Iowa to completely recover from recession losses.

In fact, even though Iowa has more jobs than it did when the recession started, the state shows a jobs deficit:

Basic RGBSource: Economic Policy Institute

Given that the population of Iowa has grown since the start of the recession, it makes sense that more jobs need to be added to the economy each year in order to keep up with the growing number of people. According to the Economic Policy Institute, 23,800 jobs have been added so far but 71,600 were needed by now to keep up with this growth. This means that there aren’t enough jobs for everyone who wants or needs one — a deficit of 47,800, as shown in the graph above.

For more about the latest Iowa job numbers, see our new Iowa JobWatch report. IPP has given its view of the monthly numbers since 2003 — there are always plenty of new angles for a “Job Watcher.”

IPP-gibney5464   Posted by Heather Gibney, Research Associate

Author: iowapolicypoints

The Iowa Policy Project is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization that provides research and analysis to engage Iowans in state policy decisions. We focus on tax and busget issues, the Iowa economy, and energy and environmental policy. By providing a foundation of fact-based, objective research and engaging the public in an informed discussion of policy alternatives, IPP advances effective, accountable and fair government.

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