Health reform turns 1

Despite heated rhetoric, health reform will help thousands in Iowa receive better and more affordable coverage, and better protect their rights as patients.

Andrew Cannon photo
Andrew Cannon

A year after it was signed into law, confusion about the health reform law remains high. With the heated rhetoric and widespread misinformation about the law, citizens can hardly be blamed for not yet understanding the Affordable Care Act.

Over the course of this week, the Iowa Fiscal Partnership — a joint project of the Iowa Policy Project and the Child and Family Policy Center — has tried to combat some of that confusion and outright misinformation. In a series of five “issue snapshots,” we have succinctly explained how certain groups of Iowans will be impacted by the health law.

On Monday, our brief snapshot described some features of the law designed to help small businesses, which provide insurance to employees in far lower numbers than larger firms. Small businesses may qualify for tax credits if the provide coverage to employees now, and will have access to a new health insurance marketplace beginning in 2014.

Our Tuesday release focused on how senior citizens will be impacted by the new law. Gaps in Medicare prescription drug coverage will gradually be phased out and Medicare enrollees need no longer worry about co-pays for approved preventive treatments.

On the actual anniversary of health reform becoming the law of the land, our Wednesday snapshot explored some of the consumer protections featured in the law. Patients’ need no longer worry about bumping against a benefits ceiling; lifetime benefit limits are eliminated and annual benefits limits will be phased out. The law enshrines the right of patients to choose their own provider; that choice may not be dictated by insurance carriers or the government.

Our Thursday snapshot focused on the law’s impact on Iowa women. Many women are only one family tragedy away from losing their coverage. Just 28 percent of Iowa women have their health coverage through their own job.  In 2014, Iowa women, along with all Iowans, will have a host of new health coverage options. Medicaid eligibility will be raised and lower- and middle-income families will be eligible for premium assistance from the government to purchase insurance coverage in the new state-based marketplaces.

Today, our snapshot details some of the law’s benefits for Iowa’s youth — from infants up to 25-year old young adults. The 51,300 Iowa children with a pre-existing condition will never be denied coverage for that reason; insurers are prohibited from denying children health coverage due to pre-existing conditions. Young adults through age 25 may also remain on their parents’ insurance plans, regardless of whether they are in school or just starting a career.

In spite of some of the heated rhetoric that continues against health reform, it will help thousands of Iowans receive better and more affordable health coverage, as well as protecting their rights as patients.

Posted by Andrew Cannon, Research Associate

Author: iowapolicypoints

The Iowa Policy Project is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization that provides research and analysis to engage Iowans in state policy decisions. We focus on tax and busget issues, the Iowa economy, and energy and environmental policy. By providing a foundation of fact-based, objective research and engaging the public in an informed discussion of policy alternatives, IPP advances effective, accountable and fair government.

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