Workforce Education: Good investment for Iowa

No matter the indicator — unemployment rates, wages or poverty — it is undeniable that education pays for Iowans.

Lily French
Lily French

Investments in workforce education improve economic prospects for Iowa families, and in the process boost the state budget. We have found that investing in postsecondary education for low-income adults returns tax revenue more than double the state’s costs. In fact, the state can garner $3.70 in increased tax revenue for every dollar invested in an associate’s degree and $2.40 for every dollar invested in a bachelor’s degree for low-income adults. (See Education Pays in Iowa, Executive Summary; Full Report)

State investments in workforce education can also greatly improve the economic futures of Iowans struggling to support their families. No matter the indicator — unemployment rates, wages or poverty — it is undeniable that education pays for Iowans. In a state where wages are stagnating for less-educated workers, many Iowans were having a difficult time making ends meet even before the current recession began.

Further, a projected shortage of skilled labor combined with the rising cost to families for postsecondary education demands that Iowa invest in workforce education to address our state’s education gap. When low-income adults have access to increased education and training, their lifetime earnings increase substantially, generating tax revenue for the state that more than offsets the cost of investing in this access.

To garner the largest fiscal returns and set the state firmly on the path toward economic growth, Iowa should:

■ Expand financial aid to help low-income working adults pay for postsecondary education, by

  • creating a tuition scholarship program for low-income workers to pursue an associate or bachelor’s degree at one of Iowa’s public colleges;
  • fully funding Iowa Work-Study at its standing-limited appropriation of $2.75 million.

■ Promote education and training within Iowa’s TANF program, by

  • directing program administrators and case managers to promote education with Promise Job clients;
  • using American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) TANF Emergency Contingency funds to support education and training for a greater number of TANF participants.

■ Modify Iowa’s WIA plan to enhance training provisions, by

  • setting local funds for training at minimum level required for eligibility to additional discretionary funds;
  • using discretionary funds to advance postsecondary educational opportunities.

Expanding access to education and training for low-wage workers is particularly important when economic prospects are dim. An investment in workforce skills would prepare Iowans for the future and contribute to rebuilding our economy.

Posted by Lily French, Research Associate/Outreach Coordinator

Excerpted from Lily’s written testimony to the Iowa legislative Job Training Needs Study Committee, Nov. 3, 2009. Also see the IPP backgrounder.

Author: iowapolicypoints

The Iowa Policy Project is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization that provides research and analysis to engage Iowans in state policy decisions. We focus on tax and busget issues, the Iowa economy, and energy and environmental policy. By providing a foundation of fact-based, objective research and engaging the public in an informed discussion of policy alternatives, IPP advances effective, accountable and fair government.

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