Iowa follows U.S. patterns on loss of employer-sponsored coverage

new report from the Economic Policy Institute traces the erosion of job-based health coverage across the last decade — and the slowing of that decline in the last year. Nationally, as EPI Director of Health Policy Research Elise Gould underscores, job-based health coverage has shed almost 14 million non-elderly Americans since 2000. But slow improvement in the national economy over the last year, coupled with key components of the Affordable Care Act (most notably the provision that young adults are allowed to stay on or join their parents health insurance policies) have slowed those losses since 2011.

The other important trend across this decade is the dramatic growth in public health insurance. Medicaid and CHIP (hawk-i in Iowa) have picked up coverage for at least some of those who have lost job-based coverage. While losses (2000 to 2012) in employer-sponsored insurance were greater among children than among non-elderly adults, for example, the share of children without any coverage actually fell 1.8 percentage points.

Basic RGBMuch the same pattern has played out in Iowa.  In 2000-2001, Iowa’s rate of job-based coverage for those under the age of 65 was 76.9 percent — one of the highest rates in the nation; by 2011-2012, that had fallen to 64.5 percent — closer to the middle of the pack among states.

As the graphic below shows (Iowa is the red dot), this was one of the steepest rates of loss in the nation (coverage down 12.4 percent) and represented a net loss in job-based coverage of over 200,000 non-elderly Iowans. Of those losing coverage, about half (97,075) were working-age adults and about half (111,839) were kids (indeed, the share of kids losing job-based coverage in Iowa, at 16 percent, was the highest in the country).

ESI changes in statesclick on graph for interactive version

Again, public programs pick up some of this slack. Since 2000, Iowa has enrolled about 120,000 more working age adults in Medicaid, and added another 80,000 to the ranks of the uninsured. For Iowa’s kids, public coverage (Medicaid and hawk-i) has been much more effective — picking up 140,000 Iowans under the age of 18 since 2000, while actually reducing the number of kids uninsured.

Colin GordonPosted by Colin Gordon, Senior Research Consultant

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